Categories
Journalism

Please find one defamation case from a NON-US Common Law jurisdiction* that is m

Please find one defamation case from a NON-US Common Law jurisdiction* that is making headlines in the past few weeks or months. (Nothing over 2 months old). Your journal entry should:
1. Explain the case;
2. Apply the DIP principles to the case. Here is an example (this is not from a real case):
In this action, the Plaintiff, Mr. Johnoman Bellen is suing Fair Daily Newspapers Ltd for defamation based on an article they wrote entitled “Bellen’s Bad for Business”. In this article, Mr. Bellen, a world famous master dance instructor, was accused of charging his clients millions for ‘exclusive’ dance training while he was covertly working with their opponents at the same time. It was also mentioned that none of his clients had won any major competitions in the past 5 years. D: The article accuses Bellen of taking money under false pretenses, this is immoral and could be illegal. The article also implies Bellen is incompetent, since his clients do not win any competitions. Overall, the statements (until proven true or otherwise defended) would cause the average person in Hong Kong to hold him in less regard. I: Mr. Bellen is named in the article. He is identifiable. P: The article is published on Fair Daily News, which has a circulation of 500,000 papers. In addition, this article was posted to its Facebook page, where it generated 800,000 views. *Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Malaysia, UK, South Africa, India, Jamaica – not an exhaustive list, which can be found here – but these jurisdictions will have a greater likelihood of being reported on in English in a reliable news source. CHECK your sources carefully – do not use blogs or tabloids – use trusted media outlets only.

Categories
Journalism

Please find one defamation case from a NON-US Common Law jurisdiction* that is m

Please find one defamation case from a NON-US Common Law jurisdiction* that is making headlines in the past few weeks or months. (Nothing over 2 months old).
Your journal entry should:
1. Explain the case;
2. Apply the DIP principles to the case.
Here is an example (this is not from a real case):
In this action, the Plaintiff, Mr. Johnoman Bellen is suing Fair Daily Newspapers Ltd for defamation based on an article they wrote entitled “Bellen’s Bad for Business”. In this article, Mr. Bellen, a world famous master dance instructor, was accused of charging his clients millions for ‘exclusive’ dance training while he was covertly working with their opponents at the same time. It was also mentioned that none of his clients had won any major competitions in the past 5 years.
D: The article accuses Bellen of taking money under false pretenses, this is immoral and could be illegal. The article also implies Bellen is incompetent, since his clients do not win any competitions. Overall, the statements (until proven true or otherwise defended) would cause the average person in Hong Kong to hold him in less regard.
I: Mr. Bellen is named in the article. He is identifiable.
P: The article is published on Fair Daily News, which has a circulation of 500,000 papers. In addition, this article was posted to its Facebook page, where it generated 800,000 views.
*Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Malaysia, UK, South Africa, India, Jamaica – not an exhaustive list, which can be found here – but these jurisdictions will have a greater likelihood of being reported on in English in a reliable news source. CHECK your sources carefully – do not use blogs or tabloids – use trusted media outlets only.

Categories
Journalism

Whats the idea?

Write a complete, inverted pyramid news story based on the reporter notes provided below. Integrate at least two direct quotes in the story. Grammar, spelling and punctuation errors exist in the notes; it is up to you to identify and correct the errors and adhere to Associate Press style at all times. You have 75 minutes to complete this assignment.
Story Slug: School Board Location: Long Beach
There’s a totally new idea starting to be implemented in your city. Some call it “a pilot program.” Others call it “a satellite school.” Your School Board likes the idea because it saves the board money. Businesses like it because it helps them attract and retain good employees. There was a meeting of your citys School Board last night. Greg Hubbard, superintendent of your citys school system, recommended the idea, and the School Board then proceeded to vote 6-1 in favor of trying the new idea. Whats the idea? Its to mix companies and classrooms. Recently, plans were announced to construct a major new General Electric manufacturing plant in your city. The plant will employ a total of more than 600 employees, many of them women who will work on assembly lines, helping make small appliances for the new General Electric plant. To attract and retain qualified women, many of whom have young children, the plant wants a school to be located on its premises. It offered to provide, free of charge, free space: to construct a separate building on its premises with 3 rooms built according to the School Boards specifications. Its the wave of the future, Hubbard told the School Board last night. Its a win-win situation, he added. He explained that it is a good employee benefit, and it helps ease crowding in the districts schools if some students go elsewhere. The details are being negotiated. To start with at first, the school will have three rooms and serve about 60 kindergarten and first-grade children of employees. The school district will equip the classrooms and pay the salaries of a teacher and a teachers aide for each classroom. At this point in time there are only approximately 20 school districts in the entire country trying the idea. Students will eat in the factorys employee cafeteria and play on a playground also provided by the new factory. Parents will provide transportation to and from the facility. Equipping each classroom will cost in the neighborhood of approximately $10,000. The price is about the same as for a regular classroom. Hubbard said if the program is successful, it will expand to other companies. A company will have to supply a minimum of 20 children to justify the cost of the program which could, if successful, serve young students in 2nd and possibly 3rd grades as well. The program is thought to attract and retain more employees-to reduce the rate of attrition, thus saving companies the cost of training new employees. That is especially important in industries with many low-paying positions in which there is often a high turnover. Its also a solution to working parents who feel there is never enough time to spend with their children. Hubbard said one of the nice things is that many will have the opportunity to ride to and from work and also have lunch with their children.

Categories
Journalism

Provide 10 examples of news about china in the west in recent years that turned out to be fake stories, with sources explaining why they were fake/misleading

Provide 10 examples of news about China in the west in recent years that turned out to be fake stories, with sources explaining why they were fake/misleading

Categories
Journalism

Write a news story based on the following transcript from a murder trial.

INSTRUCTIONS: You will write a story based on the following information. Your story should be in inverted-pyramid-style, with a summary lead. The length should be 350 to 600 words. Use correct AP Style, grammar and punctuation.
You are a court reporting covering the murder trial of Frank Biegel, 43, of Long Beach, and Eric A. Knapp, 27, of Long Beach, who are accused of robbing a local service station of $83 in July 2022 and of abducting and murdering the attendant, Larry Totmann, age 17.
Both men are charged with first-degree murder and robbery. They have both pleaded not guilty to the crimes. The defense attorney is Cheryl Miller; the prosecutor is District Attorney Ramon Hernandez; Judge Joshua Sanchez is presiding. The trial is being held at the Governor Deukmejian Courthouse in Long Beach.
You are covering this trial today, on Wednesday, Oct. 26. The trial began Monday, Oct. 24, with opening statements; this is the third day of the trial. The prosecution is expected to rest its case Friday, Oct. 28, and the defense is expected to begin its case the following Monday, Oct. 31. Your story is for publication in Thursday’s edition of the daily newspaper.
Write a news story based on the following transcript from a murder trial. “Q” stands for the questions of District Attorney Ramon Hernandez, and “A” stands for the answers of Frank Biegel, one of the defendants. The questions and answers are the men’s exact words and may be quoted directly.
GRADING: Grade will be based on how well you summarize the most interesting and important information in the lead, and how well you structure the story throughout. You will also be graded on accuracy, how well you use quotes and AP Style, grammar and punctuation.
Due: 11:59 p.m. Oct. 31
Q: Well, let me ask you this. Did you commit a robbery at a service station on Baytree Road last July 14?
A: Yes, I did.
Q: And did you help take the attendant, Larry Totmann, out to a campground somewhere away from that station?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: And did you personally see Eric Knapp, your co-defendant, shoot and kill that attendant?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: Describe for us how you and Knapp went about robbing and murdering Totmann.
A: It wasn’t me. It was Knapp that shot the kid, not me. We had gone up to the gas station, got my car filled with gas. While I was . . . I went in the bathroom. While I was in the bathroom some other people drove up in a car, young kids it sounded like, and they had an argument with the attendant about using the telephone. When it was all over, I came out, and I got back in the car while Knapp put a gun on him.
Q: All right. Did the young people who had driven up, did they leave before you got back into the car?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: Then what happened?
A: I started the car, and Knapp made the kid take all the money out of the register, and he found a gun hidden under the counter and put it in a box with the money.
Q: Tell us what happened after that.
A: Well, sir, Knapp told the kid to get into the car with us, and, uh, I drove out of town about five miles.
Q: Where was Knapp all that time?
A: He was in the back seat with the kid. He had his gun on him, and the box with the money.
Q: And then what happened?
A: I was driving out toward a campground I use sometimes, and Knapp told me to stop. He told the kid to get out of the car and lay down in some bushes along the road. I didn’t know he was going to shoot the kid, I swear. The kid hadn’t caused us any trouble, and I thought we’d just dump him there so he couldn’t call the cops right away.
Q: But Knapp shot him, didn’t he?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: How many times?
A: Four. He fired four shots. I don’t know how many times he hit him.
Q: Did Knapp shoot him in the head?
A: Well, sir, I couldn’t see that. It was dark, and they were off the side of the road. I just heard the shots and saw like blue flames coming out of his gun.
Q: Uh, how far away from Totmann was Knapp when the shots were fired?
A: Not over three or five feet. He was standing right over him.
Q: Did Totmann say anything or try to run away?
A: No, he just kept lying there. He’d done everything we said, and I don’t think he expected it. He just lay there; he never moved.
Q: What . . . well, what did you do after that?
A: I drove Eric home. We had a couple beers at his apartment and divided the money. There wasn’t much, not even a hundred dollars.
Q: What did you do with the gun?
A: The next night we went out and threw both guns down a sewer. It was over on the other side of town, near a ballpark.
Q: Do you know why Knapp decided to kill Totmann?
A: He told me the kid recognized him, that the kid had seen him before. And he . . . he was afraid the kid might’ve seen my license number, the license number on my car.
Q: Why didn’t you try to prevent the murder?
A: How could I? I didn’t know he was going to shoot anyone, I really didn’t. We’d never talked about that. I thought we’d just drop the kid there and leave.
Q: Can you tell us why you’ve decided to confess?
A: The murder wasn’t my idea; I didn’t pull the trigger. I didn’t know Eric was going to shoot the kid. I don’t think I should die, and I thought maybe if I cooperated, I wouldn’t get the death penalty.
Q: Have the police or anyone else promised you anything in return for testifying against Knapp?
A: No sir. No one’s promised me anything, nothing at all. I wish they would

Categories
Journalism

Did the young people who had driven up, did they leave before you got back into the car?

INSTRUCTIONS: You will write a story based on the following information. Your story should be in inverted-pyramid-style, with a summary lead. The length should be 350 to 600 words. Use correct AP Style, grammar and punctuation.
You are a court reporting covering the murder trial of Frank Biegel, 43, of Long Beach, and Eric A. Knapp, 27, of Long Beach, who are accused of robbing a local service station of $83 in July 2022 and of abducting and murdering the attendant, Larry Totmann, age 17.
Both men are charged with first-degree murder and robbery. They have both pleaded not guilty to the crimes. The defense attorney is Cheryl Miller; the prosecutor is District Attorney Ramon Hernandez; Judge Joshua Sanchez is presiding. The trial is being held at the Governor Deukmejian Courthouse in Long Beach.
You are covering this trial today, on Wednesday, Oct. 26. The trial began Monday, Oct. 24, with opening statements; this is the third day of the trial. The prosecution is expected to rest its case Friday, Oct. 28, and the defense is expected to begin its case the following Monday, Oct. 31. Your story is for publication in Thursday’s edition of the daily newspaper.
Write a news story based on the following transcript from a murder trial. “Q” stands for the questions of District Attorney Ramon Hernandez, and “A” stands for the answers of Frank Biegel, one of the defendants. The questions and answers are the men’s exact words and may be quoted directly.
GRADING: Grade will be based on how well you summarize the most interesting and important information in the lead, and how well you structure the story throughout. You will also be graded on accuracy, how well you use quotes and AP Style, grammar and punctuation.
Due: 11:59 p.m. Oct. 31
Q: Well, let me ask you this. Did you commit a robbery at a service station on Baytree Road last July 14?
A: Yes, I did.
Q: And did you help take the attendant, Larry Totmann, out to a campground somewhere away from that station?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: And did you personally see Eric Knapp, your co-defendant, shoot and kill that attendant?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: Describe for us how you and Knapp went about robbing and murdering Totmann.
A: It wasn’t me. It was Knapp that shot the kid, not me. We had gone up to the gas station, got my car filled with gas. While I was . . . I went in the bathroom. While I was in the bathroom some other people drove up in a car, young kids it sounded like, and they had an argument with the attendant about using the telephone. When it was all over, I came out, and I got back in the car while Knapp put a gun on him.
Q: All right. Did the young people who had driven up, did they leave before you got back into the car?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: Then what happened?
A: I started the car, and Knapp made the kid take all the money out of the register, and he found a gun hidden under the counter and put it in a box with the money.
Q: Tell us what happened after that.
A: Well, sir, Knapp told the kid to get into the car with us, and, uh, I drove out of town about five miles.
Q: Where was Knapp all that time?
A: He was in the back seat with the kid. He had his gun on him, and the box with the money.
Q: And then what happened?
A: I was driving out toward a campground I use sometimes, and Knapp told me to stop. He told the kid to get out of the car and lay down in some bushes along the road. I didn’t know he was going to shoot the kid, I swear. The kid hadn’t caused us any trouble, and I thought we’d just dump him there so he couldn’t call the cops right away.
Q: But Knapp shot him, didn’t he?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: How many times?
A: Four. He fired four shots. I don’t know how many times he hit him.
Q: Did Knapp shoot him in the head?
A: Well, sir, I couldn’t see that. It was dark, and they were off the side of the road. I just heard the shots and saw like blue flames coming out of his gun.
Q: Uh, how far away from Totmann was Knapp when the shots were fired?
A: Not over three or five feet. He was standing right over him.
Q: Did Totmann say anything or try to run away?
A: No, he just kept lying there. He’d done everything we said, and I don’t think he expected it. He just lay there; he never moved.
Q: What . . . well, what did you do after that?
A: I drove Eric home. We had a couple beers at his apartment and divided the money. There wasn’t much, not even a hundred dollars.
Q: What did you do with the gun?
A: The next night we went out and threw both guns down a sewer. It was over on the other side of town, near a ballpark.
Q: Do you know why Knapp decided to kill Totmann?
A: He told me the kid recognized him, that the kid had seen him before. And he . . . he was afraid the kid might’ve seen my license number, the license number on my car.
Q: Why didn’t you try to prevent the murder?
A: How could I? I didn’t know he was going to shoot anyone, I really didn’t. We’d never talked about that. I thought we’d just drop the kid there and leave.
Q: Can you tell us why you’ve decided to confess?
A: The murder wasn’t my idea; I didn’t pull the trigger. I didn’t know Eric was going to shoot the kid. I don’t think I should die, and I thought maybe if I cooperated, I wouldn’t get the death penalty.
Q: Have the police or anyone else promised you anything in return for testifying against Knapp?
A: No sir. No one’s promised me anything, nothing at all. I wish they would

Categories
Journalism

Explain in detail what kind of research you would need to conduct to more further develop your swot analysis.

Choose ONE organization and situation from the list below. Think of a public relations campaign idea that would be helpful in solving the outlined problem or opportunity. Do a high-level SWOT analysis of that organization (you may need to do some online research if you’re not familiar with the organization). Now think of what information may be missing from your SWOT that you would need to effectively implement your campaign. What kind of secondary and/or primary research would you need to do to more thoroughly develop your SWOT analysis for that organization? Be specific. You may want to re-visit chapter 5 of the textbook for more detailed information on what constitutes a Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat. Organization/Goal
Starbucks / To rebuild and strengthen relationships with diverse publics after a series of highly-publicized racial bias incidents in their stores.
Dominican Republic Ministry of Tourism / To highlight the positive aspects of vacation experiences in the country after a string of highly-publicized and seemingly unexplained deaths.
Boeing / To convey Boeing’s commitment to travelers in the wake of two crashes and criticism over the safety of their new 737 Max planes.
Air BNB / To showcase the positive experiences and opportunities that Air BNB brings to family travel in the aftermath of accusations that the service displaces long-term renters and creates “bad neighbors.”
US Women’s National Soccer Team / To advocate for equal pay.
For full credit, be sure to: List the organization/problem you chose.
Briefly describe your public relations campaign idea.
Include at least 3-4 bullets for each category: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats.
Explain in detail what kind of research you would need to conduct to more further develop your SWOT analysis.
Note: Your SWOT analysis does NOT need to be formatted graphically to represent the square you see in the textbook/lecture. You may simply type out the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats as bullets under each sub-head. See below.
Strengths
Bullet 1
Bullet 2
Bullet 3
Bullet 4
Weaknesses
Bullet 1
Bullet 2
Bullet 3
Bullet 4
Opportunities
Bullet 1
Bullet 2
Bullet 3
Bullet 4
Threats
Bullet 1
Bullet 2
Bullet 3
Bullet 4

Categories
Journalism

Please incorporate those into your paper in apa format.

InstructionsFor the Unit VIII Case Study, you will focus on terrorism and terrorism prevention in your community. Start by conducting research around your community/location for examples of mitigation and prevention against terrorism. When looking for terrorism in your community, consider examples such as an active shooter threat or actual occurrence or a bomb threat or occurrence. For example, if you are in the Boston area, consider the Boston Marathon bombing, prevention methods used in museums, metal detectors, etc. If you are not in an area where terrorism is a concern, research an area that is, and use online images.
Take photographs of what you find so that you can show your professor what your area has done to address the issue of terrorism. If you are unable to find prevention methods in your community, you may use a nearby community or research one.
Using what you learned about your community and what you learned about past disasters from this course, write a case study, a minimum of four pages in length, that addresses the following points.
Explain what has been done with regard to mitigation, recovery, and/or response efforts within your community or the community you researched. Mitigation examples include security, cameras, and metal detectors.
Explain who conducted these efforts and the vulnerabilities they faced in their community, and include the role these individuals or groups play with mitigating, responding, and/or recovering from the risk.
Research at least one major disaster that resulted due to terrorism. Explain the mitigation and recovery efforts.
What can your community, or the community you researched, learn from past disasters?
Consider the types of communication that would need to be used in the event of a terror attack. Discuss the organizations that would be involved, the forms of media that would be used, and the types of communication that would need to be provided to the public.
Your paper should be a minimum of four pages in length not counting the title and reference pages. You are required to use a minimum of three outside sources as part of your case study. One outside source must be from the CSU Online Library. All sources, including the textbook, must be cited and referenced according to APA guidelines.
Additionally, include at least four visual aids/images that support your content (one 4-by-4 inch image per page maximum). Please incorporate those into your paper in APA format. Click here for steps on how to resize the image.

Categories
Journalism

Let me know if you need help getting access to the movie.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a journalism writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
You are to submit a minimum two-page, double-spaced paper that discusses your view of the ethical issues raised by the movie.
DO NOT RECAP THE FACTS OR PLOT LINE OF THE MOVIE IN YOUR PAPER.
I want to know what you learned from the movie and the ethical issues presented. I know the plot line of each movie, remember – I picked them. Terms and concepts from the text must be woven into your analysis.
You will have to watch the movie in order to complete the paper. Let me know if you need help getting access to the movie. Thank you so much in advance.

Categories
Journalism

Write a brief background for each article. I will start leading the class by gi

Write a brief background for each article. I will start leading the class by giving students a brief background of each article.