Categories
Astronomy

this final consists of 80 multiple choice questions with a 2 hour time limit. i

this final consists of 80 multiple choice questions with a 2 hour time limit. i will provide all materials necessary to perform well, including a study guide.

Categories
Astronomy

Write a paragraph explaining the location of the Stars plotted and whether that

Write a paragraph explaining the location of the Stars plotted and whether that matches their Roman Numeral designations such as V, lV, lll, ll, lb and la and Vl. Then explain Sub-Giants, Giants, Bright Giants, Less-luminous Supergiants, Brightest supergiants and White Dwarves and where their expected locations are on the HR Diagram. Based on the Spectral classification of each of the twenty stars plotted, do their locations make sense based on what you learned? Which of the stars plotted are still Main Sequence stars,? Which ones are Sub-Giants, Giants, Bright Giants, Less-Luminous and Brightest Supergiants and White Dwarves?

Categories
Astronomy

For this project you are going to observe some light sources. You are going to o

For this project you are going to observe some light sources. You are going to observe the SPECTRA of those light sources. If you have a spectroscope, use that. If not, you can find a poor-man’s spectroscope in the form of a DVD or CD. The DVD does the same job as the diffraction grating in the spectroscope, that is, it spreads out the light from the source into its component colors. You studied spectra and spectrographs in Ch. 4. Remember? R-E-M-E-M-B-E-R ???
Let the light from the source shine in through the slit in the spectroscope (The one we handed out at the equipment distribution. If you don’t have one, let me know and maybe we can arrange another distribution). It takes some practice to produce a nice rainbow, or spectrum. For example the Sun delivers way more light than you need, but the Moon’s spectrum is tough to see because the Moon is much fainter than the Sun and only a narrow slit allows the light through. You will be able to see rainbows on the left and right, and even on top of the wavelength scale, depending on how you hold the spectroscope.
If you are rockin’ a DVD, well that’s just sad. Tilt the shiny side toward the light source, this way and that, and try to make a decent rainbow. Distant sources (like the Sun) will be easier, as will small sources (like a pen light or candle flame). Big sources like a TV screen or forest fire will be difficult: There will be fat, overlapping spectra.
Try observing the Sun, an incandescent light bulb, an LED light, a fluorescent light, a candle flame, gas flame from stove or propane torch, street light, red light from electric stove coil.
Draw me a picture of your observations. Make it look like a long bar, with sections representing the different colors. One bar for each spectrum/light source observed. With colored pencils you could indicate the colors and brightnesses. I would cry tears of joy if I saw real colors. If not that, at least label the parts of the spectrum in words, indicating colors and brightnesses. Send me a photo or scan of your picture.
I’d be pleased to see a few comments on what you’ve seen. For example, “I was surprised how little yellow light I saw in the spectrum of a candle flame. There definitely wasn’t much blue, but there was a lot of RED.”
I expect you to draw me at least SIX RAIBOWS, i.e., spectra. Be a careful observer and recorder. Don’t just make a kindergarten mess with your crayons. I know what these spectra are supposed to look like, so pay attention. This is easy points if you do a good job the first time. Many of your predecessors did not and brought great pain upon themselves.

Categories
Astronomy

For this project you are going to observe some light sources. You are going to o

For this project you are going to observe some light sources. You are going to observe the SPECTRA of those light sources. If you have a spectroscope, use that. If not, you can find a poor-man’s spectroscope in the form of a DVD or CD. The DVD does the same job as the diffraction grating in the spectroscope, that is, it spreads out the light from the source into its component colors. You studied spectra and spectrographs in Ch. 4. Remember? R-E-M-E-M-B-E-R ???
Let the light from the source shine in through the slit in the spectroscope (The one we handed out at the equipment distribution. If you don’t have one, let me know and maybe we can arrange another distribution). It takes some practice to produce a nice rainbow, or spectrum. For example the Sun delivers way more light than you need, but the Moon’s spectrum is tough to see because the Moon is much fainter than the Sun and only a narrow slit allows the light through. You will be able to see rainbows on the left and right, and even on top of the wavelength scale, depending on how you hold the spectroscope.
If you are rockin’ a DVD, well that’s just sad. Tilt the shiny side toward the light source, this way and that, and try to make a decent rainbow. Distant sources (like the Sun) will be easier, as will small sources (like a pen light or candle flame). Big sources like a TV screen or forest fire will be difficult: There will be fat, overlapping spectra.
Try observing the Sun, an incandescent light bulb, an LED light, a fluorescent light, a candle flame, gas flame from stove or propane torch, street light, red light from electric stove coil.
Draw me a picture of your observations. Make it look like a long bar, with sections representing the different colors. One bar for each spectrum/light source observed. With colored pencils you could indicate the colors and brightnesses. I would cry tears of joy if I saw real colors. If not that, at least label the parts of the spectrum in words, indicating colors and brightnesses. Send me a photo or scan of your picture.
I’d be pleased to see a few comments on what you’ve seen. For example, “I was surprised how little yellow light I saw in the spectrum of a candle flame. There definitely wasn’t much blue, but there was a lot of RED.”
I expect you to draw me at least SIX RAIBOWS, i.e., spectra. Be a careful observer and recorder. Don’t just make a kindergarten mess with your crayons. I know what these spectra are supposed to look like, so pay attention. This is easy points if you do a good job the first time. Many of your predecessors did not and brought great pain upon themselves.

Categories
Astronomy

Write a paragraph explaining the location of the Stars plotted and whether that

Write a paragraph explaining the location of the Stars plotted and whether that matches their Roman Numeral designations such as V, lV, lll, ll, lb and la and Vl. Then explain Sub-Giants, Giants, Bright Giants, Less-luminous Supergiants, Brightest supergiants and White Dwarves and where their expected locations are on the HR Diagram. Based on the Spectral classification of each of the twenty stars plotted, do their locations make sense based on what you learned? Which of the stars plotted are still Main Sequence stars,? Which ones are Sub-Giants, Giants, Bright Giants, Less-Luminous and Brightest Supergiants and White Dwarves?

Categories
Astronomy

plot 10 bright stars and 10 nears stars using their spectral type and luminosity

plot 10 bright stars and 10 nears stars using their spectral type and luminosity. Then color from red to violet according to their temperature

Categories
Astronomy

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the co

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the course all together into one scientific argument.
Make a scientific argument about whether or not you think the Webb Observatory (or another current mission such as Perseverence) will discover life. Your argument should show significant understanding of:
The specifics of the mission (e.g. Webb Observatory or Perseverence) that are underway for the search for extraterrestrial life. What are they looking for? What is the technology they use? Why is this unique to the mission? What have they found thus far?
What types of life forms are most likely to be found first and what types of evidence we should look for to find these life forms.
The types of locations where these life forms may exist and how the life forms are biologically well suited for those environments.
Your paper MUST BE FORMATTED WITH THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND HEADERS (Please actually use these headers for the sections of your paper or you risk getting a 0):
Introduction
The Likelihood of [specific mission] to Find Life
The Most Promising Types of Extraterrestrial Life to be Found by the Mission
The Location Explored by the Mission and Evidence that It Could Harbour Life
The Societal Implications of Such A Discovery
Conclusion
References
You are expected to use information you have learned on the course to EXPAND upon the information from the videos and discussions. Cutting and pasting from the Internet, or simple re-writes of what is on wikipedia or one web site does not constitute a term paper. You must demonstrate your OWN learning of the material in the course. This will be strictly enforced. Please note that I have old papers saved on my machine and will do a comparison check. If you use pieces from old papers, the paper will not be accepted and you risk academic disciplinary action if discovered.
All papers MUST follow this format or it risks getting a 0.
Criteria for a successful paper:
A successful paper will be at least 2000 words and will follow the format above. It will include:
A clear, accurate, and coherent scientific argument that uses scientifically valid information (from the Internet or journals) and many of the main concepts used in the course. Your paper should demonstrate your understanding of these concepts, not just the awareness of the terminology.
A clear organization and correct grammar to provide a readable and intelligent paper. It should be easy and pleasurable to read. This must include an introduction, conclusion, and the mandatory headers to help make clarify your argument.
Within this format, your paper should demonstrate individuality and creativity to show how you have digested and interpreted the information, and to show me it is your OWN work. Papers that read like a bunch of cut and paste text without any personality will be poorly graded.
A complete and consistent set of citations and references in APA, IEEE, or similar academic format. I don’t care which format you use, but be consistent and thorough.
Pride in your work. If you don’t love it, I won’t love it.

Categories
Astronomy

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the co

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the course all together into one scientific argument.
Make a scientific argument about whether or not you think the Webb Observatory (or another current mission such as Perseverence) will discover life. Your argument should show significant understanding of:
The specifics of the mission (e.g. Webb Observatory or Perseverence) that are underway for the search for extraterrestrial life. What are they looking for? What is the technology they use? Why is this unique to the mission? What have they found thus far?
What types of life forms are most likely to be found first and what types of evidence we should look for to find these life forms.
The types of locations where these life forms may exist and how the life forms are biologically well suited for those environments.
Your paper MUST BE FORMATTED WITH THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND HEADERS (Please actually use these headers for the sections of your paper or you risk getting a 0):
Introduction
The Likelihood of [specific mission] to Find Life
The Most Promising Types of Extraterrestrial Life to be Found by the Mission
The Location Explored by the Mission and Evidence that It Could Harbour Life
The Societal Implications of Such A Discovery
Conclusion
References
You are expected to use information you have learned on the course to EXPAND upon the information from the videos and discussions. Cutting and pasting from the Internet, or simple re-writes of what is on wikipedia or one web site does not constitute a term paper. You must demonstrate your OWN learning of the material in the course. This will be strictly enforced. Please note that I have old papers saved on my machine and will do a comparison check. If you use pieces from old papers, the paper will not be accepted and you risk academic disciplinary action if discovered.
All papers MUST follow this format or it risks getting a 0.
Criteria for a successful paper:
A successful paper will be at least 2000 words and will follow the format above. It will include:
A clear, accurate, and coherent scientific argument that uses scientifically valid information (from the Internet or journals) and many of the main concepts used in the course. Your paper should demonstrate your understanding of these concepts, not just the awareness of the terminology.
A clear organization and correct grammar to provide a readable and intelligent paper. It should be easy and pleasurable to read. This must include an introduction, conclusion, and the mandatory headers to help make clarify your argument.
Within this format, your paper should demonstrate individuality and creativity to show how you have digested and interpreted the information, and to show me it is your OWN work. Papers that read like a bunch of cut and paste text without any personality will be poorly graded.
A complete and consistent set of citations and references in APA, IEEE, or similar academic format. I don’t care which format you use, but be consistent and thorough.
Pride in your work. If you don’t love it, I won’t love it.

Categories
Astronomy

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the co

The term paper is a chance for you to bring the key points you learned in the course all together into one scientific argument.
Make a scientific argument about whether or not you think the Webb Observatory (or another current mission such as Perseverence) will discover life. Your argument should show significant understanding of:
The specifics of the mission (e.g. Webb Observatory or Perseverence) that are underway for the search for extraterrestrial life. What are they looking for? What is the technology they use? Why is this unique to the mission? What have they found thus far?
What types of life forms are most likely to be found first and what types of evidence we should look for to find these life forms.
The types of locations where these life forms may exist and how the life forms are biologically well suited for those environments.
Your paper MUST BE FORMATTED WITH THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND HEADERS (Please actually use these headers for the sections of your paper or you risk getting a 0):
Introduction
The Likelihood of [specific mission] to Find Life
The Most Promising Types of Extraterrestrial Life to be Found by the Mission
The Location Explored by the Mission and Evidence that It Could Harbour Life
The Societal Implications of Such A Discovery
Conclusion
References
You are expected to use information you have learned on the course to EXPAND upon the information from the videos and discussions. Cutting and pasting from the Internet, or simple re-writes of what is on wikipedia or one web site does not constitute a term paper. You must demonstrate your OWN learning of the material in the course. This will be strictly enforced. Please note that I have old papers saved on my machine and will do a comparison check. If you use pieces from old papers, the paper will not be accepted and you risk academic disciplinary action if discovered.
All papers MUST follow this format or it risks getting a 0.
Criteria for a successful paper:
A successful paper will be at least 2000 words and will follow the format above. It will include:
A clear, accurate, and coherent scientific argument that uses scientifically valid information (from the Internet or journals) and many of the main concepts used in the course. Your paper should demonstrate your understanding of these concepts, not just the awareness of the terminology.
A clear organization and correct grammar to provide a readable and intelligent paper. It should be easy and pleasurable to read. This must include an introduction, conclusion, and the mandatory headers to help make clarify your argument.
Within this format, your paper should demonstrate individuality and creativity to show how you have digested and interpreted the information, and to show me it is your OWN work. Papers that read like a bunch of cut and paste text without any personality will be poorly graded.
A complete and consistent set of citations and references in APA, IEEE, or similar academic format. I don’t care which format you use, but be consistent and thorough.
Pride in your work. If you don’t love it, I won’t love it.

Categories
Astronomy

Ch. 19 Study Questions 1. Explain the “cosmological redshift” (which is not the

Ch. 19 Study Questions
1. Explain the “cosmological redshift” (which is not the same as Doppler red shift).
2. Why doesn’t the expansion of the universe cause Earth and your body to expand?
3. From Earth, we see all distant galaxies flying away from US. What would you observe if you were located in one of those distant galaxies?
4. What is the cosmic microwave background?
5. What is the blackbody temperature of the microwave background?
6. Name the four fundamental forces in nature.
7. What is the name of the force that holds the atomic nucleus together?
8. The universe is amazingly uniform in temperature. Amazing because there hasn’t been enough time for heat to mix around and bring the universe to uniform temperature. What theory explains this implausible uniformity of temperature?
9. There are about 100 naturally occurring chemical elements, or kinds of atoms. Which ones were made in the Big Bang?
10. Something very important happened to the universe after about 380,000 years. What was it?
11. Which type of galaxy makes stars rapidly?
12. Whey type of galaxy makes stars slowly?
13. What is the most important factor in determining whether the universe will expand forever, or eventually slow down and start contracting?